The Cross on the Devil’s Bit by Grainne Gleeson and Kate Johnson
A cross was erected on the Rock in 1953-1954 in celebration of the ‘Marian Year’ dedicated by the Roman Catholic Church. A committee was formed and planning of the work began in early 1953 and construction began in September of that year. Work was completed at a cost of approximately €2,000. The cross was officially blessed by the Archbishop of Cashel and Emly, Most Rev. Dr. Jeremiah Kinane, on Sunday, 22 August 1954. It stands 45 feet high and has a span of 25 feet. The base of 340 tons is 5 feet squared and 10 feet deep. All tools and materials for this construction project were carried to the Rock by hand. The cross is presently illuminated at night. Holy Mass is celebrated at the base of the Rock each year on Rock Sunday, which is the closest Sunday to the feast of St. James (25 July). A statue of the Virgin Mary was erected in 1988 on the eastern side of the Rock. 
Some Sundays when the weather is nice, locals and tourists go hand gliding, rock-climbing, hill walking etc. We can see the hand gliding from our house. We would recommend going to visit the Devil’s Bit as there are loads of fun things to do and lots of lovely views to see!

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Old School in Barnane 1846-1959 by Jack Ryan Rock and Rachel Barry
In 1846 the two national schools were founded in Barnane Boys N.S. under the National Board System. Both National Schools were located in the one building. The patron and manager of the schools was a local Protestant landlord by the name of John 'Woodcock' Carden. The schoolhouse was situated on Carden's estate and was the center building in a row of five houses (which Carden had built for his workers). It was a non-domination school and records show that no religious figures, from any Church, were authorised to come in to give religious instruction.

The daily report book also tell us that the school was a non-vested school. Records show that John Woodcock Carden built the school without any monetary help from the national board. In a letter to the board dated 10/05/1946, John Carden stated that he had ''a good slated house with an Elizabethan front''. He also stated that he had a schoolmaster's house attached to the building. The dimensions of the building were 36 by 20 by 20 feet. It was a two- story stone building and it contains two large school- rooms, one which was the boys and one which was the girls room. It was furnished with '' seven benches and forums'' and could accomodate 72 children. It was whitewashed on the inside and contained a library, small storerooms, hallways and a stairs.

The school building also contained a master's desk, a hundred books which were supplied by the national board. The school also possessed a map of Ireland, map of the world and a clock. The building itself had a value of 8 pounds and 10 pence and was exempt from rates.

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Fairy Fort by Aoife and Brid Ryan Rock  
This fairy fort would have used to keep the animals safe because there were wild animals like wolves in Ireland. People would have also lived within the fort. There would be a wooden fence around it. It is in Sean Ryan Rock’s fields in Mary Young`s. We climb the trees when we get bored when Daddy and Shane are hunting or feeding the cattle. 
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Lime Kiln by Aoife and Brid Ryan Rock 
A lime kiln is where they get lots of limestone and put heat under them. The heat would crack the stone which would be able to break into powder. The lime is then used for farming and building.  The lime kiln in Killoskehane has not been used for many years. It is now over grown after all these years. It is now just sitting in the field across the road from my house. When we were younger we used to play on the lime kiln. There is a big hole on the top of the lime kiln.The most common type of lime kiln consisted of an egg-cup shaped burning chamber constructed of brick or stone with an air inlet at the base called the 'eye'. The limestones to be burnt had to be broken into fairly uniform pieces about the size of a man's fist (by hand or using a hammer) before they were transported to the site by horse and cart or wheel-barrow.
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Killoskehane Castle by Aoife and Brid Ryan Rock
The castle was built in the 1837. It is an old castle with a two storey early 18th century wing; the latter has a projection with a very handsome, rusticated door case. In the 19th century the whole building was re-roofed. The old castle battlement and 18th century wing were given roof-dormers. A gobel was added to the projection with the door case and mul-lions were put into all the windows. The other front was made more consciously Tudor, with a porch oriel and tall chimney stack. The castle is 4 miles west of Templemore and was remodelled in 1867 to the design of Sir Thomas Newenham Deane. It is a very complex house of several different dates.  At the West End, a tower house, the a six bay, two storey, early 18th century gable-ended house with a cornice and a fine blocked architrave door case with scroll. This house appears to have been substantially altered in the mid-19th century with mul-lions inserted in the windows and advanced bay put on the front. At the rear are hand gothic additions built of rusticated limestone. On the front are dates “built 1600, rebuilt 1865”. The interior has an 1865 period-piece with original decoration, colouring, and furniture, including a huge Puginesque bed with linen fold panels. The stables probably date back from 1865.         

Owners of record
400-1600 Butlers Skehan                   1890-1908 Lillie Barry (England)
1600-1850 ± Carden (1855-1860)     1908-1977 Costigan (Liverpool)
1860 – 1870 Edward Downs Martin 1977- 1984 Stan Browne (US)
Renovation 1865                               1984-2014 A.W. Broomall (US)
 1855 – 1870 ± Willington           

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The Grotto and Carden’s Folly by Emma Wilson
The grotto on the Devil’s Bit Mountain is a special place in our locality. In the time of the penal laws people used to go up to the grotto to go to mass in secret. Catholic mass was forbidden in those times and one person would always have to be on the lookout all the time to see if the English were coming. 
Since then a statue of Holy Mary has been erected in the grotto. Also a cross was erected on the summit of the Devil’s Bit. At night the cross is illuminated so it is clearly visible in the dark, night sky. The statue of Mary is on a verge and overlooks the landscape of Tipperary and many other counties as well. 
Nowadays there is no mass held at the grotto, but every July we celebrate Rock Sunday, which is celebrated with Holy Mass.
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Fairy Fort by Gerad Kirby
The fort is on a hill beside the road. Foxes live in the fairy fort. There is a wire around the fairy fort to stop you going in. Years ago people used to put their cattle in the fort to keep them safe. People say that it is bad luck to knock down a fairy fort.  
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Local Field Names
      

      

Field Names by Brid Ryan Rock
Mary Young’s 
The Rock
Paddock
Maher’s
Devitt’s
The Field Beside the River

Joe Cahill’s Fields by Tony Cahill
Berkery’s, Delaney’s, Searsons, Paddocks 
Martin Ryan’s 
Castleiney 
Bradshaws 
The Colloup

Jack Ryan’s Fields by Jack Ryan
Berkery’s
Hennessy’s
Harnett’s
The Quarry
The New Field
The Tree Field
The One Acre
Joan Maher’s
Kennedy’s
The Garden
The Paddock
Joe Maher’s
The Field up The Road

Rachel Barry’s Fields by Rachel Barry
Eamon Ryan Mhartain’s Field

Joseph Bourke’s Fields by Joseph Bourke
Russell’s
Enda’s
Laffan’s
McGrath’s
The Stone
The three cornered field
Bourke’s

ANDREW MCALISTER’S FIELDS
The Lot Meadow
The Garrycrough
The Car-road field
The far side of the road
Mrs. Peel’s Field
The Half Ditch
Side of the house field
The Garden Field

DARREN HOUGH- WARD’S FIELD
SEARSONS
JIMMY MULLEN’S FIELDS
McGrath’s Corn Field
Stewart’s Field

KATE JOHNSON’S FIELDS
Peg’s House Field
Knocka Fields
Tom Lupton’s field
McGrath’s Field
Pat Scanlon’s 
Tommy Sheridan’s

Paudie Kinane’s Fields
Meaghers

EMMA GRANT’S FIELDS
Connie’s fields
Ryan’s Field

Local Sites and Places

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